Andaman Surgery
303 Long Road, Lowestoft, NR33 9DF
Tel: 01502 517346
Fax: 01502 531450
Out of Hours: 111
Andaman Surgery offers Extended Hours early morning GP and nurse appointments and evening GP call-backs. Flu clinics booking now including mid week clinics each week and Saturday morning 9th November.

Health A-Z - Conditions & Treatments

NHS Choices provides a Health A-Z guide to treatments and conditions. You can search by body part, subject or by selecting from the A-Z menu.

To access the full guide please click here.

We have added links to some of the most popular subjects below:

Health Subjects

 

Health Information

Child Immunisation


If a vaccine is given when a baby still has antibodies to the disease, the antibodies can stop the vaccine working. This is why routine childhood immunisations do not start until a baby is two months old, before the antibodies a baby gets from its mother have stopped working. This is also why it is important for parents to stick to the immunisation schedule, as a delay can leave a baby unprotected. A delay can increase the chance of adverse reactions to some vaccines, such as pertussis (whooping cough).


Vaccination Schedule


At two months old:
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection

At three months old:
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Meningitis C (meningococcal group C) (MenC) - one injection

At four months old:
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Meningitis C (meningococcal group C) (MenC) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection

At around 12 months old:
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningitis C (Hib/MenC) - booster dose in one injection

At around 13 months old:
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection

Three years four months to five years old (pre-school):
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio (dTaP/IPV or DTaP/IPV) - one injection
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR) - one injection

13 to 18 years old:
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and polio (Td/IPV) - one injection

Further reading


There are some excellent websites that will answer all your questions and queries about immunisation and vaccination. If you are worried about giving the MMR vaccine, you should access the MMR site.


www.immunisation.nhs.uk The most comprehensive, up-to-date and accurate source of information on vaccines, disease and immunisation in the UK.


www.immunisation.nhs.uk/Vaccines/MMR This website has been put together to answer any questions you might have about MMR. You can look for information and resources in the MMR library, ask an expert panel a question, and read up on the latest news stories relating to MMR.

Heath Checks


NHS Health Checks is a national programme offering a health check to patients aged from 40 to 74 years of age. A person may have a health check once every five years.
The NHS Health Check programme aims to help prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease. Everyone between the ages of 40 and 74, who has not already been diagnosed with one of these conditions, will be invited (once every five years) to have a check to assess their risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and diabetes and will be given support and advice to help them reduce or manage that risk. If you are having treatment for or have high blood pressure do not book a Health Check.
Please book with Rachael our Health Care Assistant or Claire Price our Practice Nurse for a Health Check appointment. The Health Check will take approximately 30 minutes and will look at blood pressure, BMI and give you a cholestrol value. The Health Check programme helps people to live longer healthier lives by reducing and detecting diseases, allowing people to be managed earlier and in doing so improve their quality of life. The Health Check helps us look after you by identifying any of these diseases enabling us to assist you with your care and detecting diseases earlier helps us control them better.

Ear Syringing


Quite often patients will turn up for an appointment for ear syringing when the procedure is unnecessary and a waste of time for both patient and nurse. Ear wax is a natural product which the body uses against ear infection.
If you consider you need your ears syringed then please follow the advice in our 'ear syringing' leaftlet which is available on 'our documents page' of the website. You can download the leaflet or you can always pop in to the surgery and pick one up.
If you turn up for an appointment to have your ears syringed and have not followed the advice then the nurse will not be able to carry out the procedure. Remember too that repetitive ear syringing can lead to the body producing more wax.

Sexual Health

Sexual Health



Both men and women need to look after their sexual health and take time to understand the issues that surround contraception and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). For instance there are some STIs, like chlamydia, that you could be carrying without having any symptoms. This infection can affect fertility, so it's important to make use of the sexual health services available for free on the NHS.

Useful Links
Sex and Young People
STIs (Sexually Transmitted Infections)
Sexual Health FAQs
Netdoctor - Sex & Relationships

Chlamydia


Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI).
Chlamydia is a bacterial infection, most commonly spread through unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sex.
75% of people infected with chlamydia don't have any symptoms. However, testing and treatment are simple.
Useful Links
The National Chlamydia Screening Programme (under-25s) has more information on chlamydia.
NHS Choices - Focus on Chlamydia

Female Health

Female Health


Cervical Screen Test
Cervical screening is a method of preventing cervical cancer by detecting abnormal cells in the cervix (lower part of the womb). Cervical screening is not a test for cancer, but it is a test to check the health of the cervix. Most women's test results show that everything is normal. But for one in 20 women, the test will show some changes in the cells of the cervix. Most of these changes will not lead to cervical cancer and the cells will go back to normal on their own. In some cases, the abnormal cells need to be treated to prevent them becoming a problem later.
Useful Links
NHS Choices - Cervical Screen Test

HPV Vaccination
Since September 2008 there has been a national programme to vaccinate girls aged 12-13 against human papilloma virus (HPV). There is also a three-year catch up campaign that will offer the HPV vaccine (also known as the cervical cancer jab) to 13-18 year old girls. The programme is delivered largely through secondary schools, and consists of three injections that are given over a six-month period. In the UK, more than 1.4 million doses have been given since the vaccination programme started.

Human papilloma virus (HPV) Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the name of a family of viruses that affect the skin and the moist membranes that line your body, such as those in your cervix, anus, mouth and throat. These membranes are called the mucosa. There are more than 100 different types of HPV viruses, with about 40 types affecting the genital area. These are classed as high risk and low risk.
What HPV infection can do
Infection with some types of HPV can cause abnormal tissue growth and other changes to cells, which can lead to cervical cancer. Infection with other forms of HPV can also cause genital warts. Other types of HPV infection can cause minor problems, such as common skin warts and verrucas. Around 30 types of HPV are transmitted through sexual contact, including those that can cause cervical cancer and genital warts. Genital warts are the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the UK. HPV infection is also linked to vaginal cancer and vulval cancer, although both are rare conditions.
Useful Links NHS choices - HPV Vaccination Cancer Research UK - HPV Virus

Contraception

Contraception




Contraception is free for most people in the UK. With 15 methods to choose from, you'll find one that suits you.


Contraceptive methods allow you to choose when and if you want to have a baby, but they don’t protect you from sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
Condoms help to protect against STIs and pregnancy, so whatever other method of contraception you're using to prevent pregnancy, use condoms as well to protect your and your partner’s health.



The methods of contraception
There are lots of methods to choose from, so don't be put off if the first thing you use isn't quite right for you; you can try another. You can read about each of the different methods of contraception by visiting these pages:

Summer Health

Summer Health
Barbecue Food Safety
It's important to cook food thoroughly at a barbecue to avoid food poisoning. Food poisoning is usually mild, and most people get better within a week. But sometimes it can be more severe, even deadly, so it’s important to take the risks seriously. Children, older people and those with weakened immune systems are particularly vulnerable to food poisoning.
The two main risk factors to cooking on the barbecue are:

  • undercooked meat
  • spreading germs from raw meat onto food that’s ready to eat

This is because raw or undercooked meat can contain germs that cause food poisoning, such as salmonella, E.coli and campylobacter. However, it’s easy to kill these germs by cooking meat until it is piping hot throughout.
When you’re cooking any kind of meat on a barbecue, such as poultry (chicken or turkey), pork, steak, burgers or sausages, make sure:
  • The coals are glowing red with a powdery grey surface before you start cooking, as this means that they're hot enough.
  • Frozen meat is properly thawed before you cook it.
  • You turn the meat regularly and move it around the barbecue to cook it evenly.

Remember that meat is safe to eat only when:
  • It is piping hot in the centre.
  • There is no pink meat visible.
  • Any juices are clear.



Hay Fever
Hay fever affects around 20% of people in the UK. Lindsey McManus of Allergy UK offers some tips on avoiding the causes and reducing your symptoms.
"The main triggers of hay fever are tree and grass pollen,” says Lindsey. “The pollen count is always higher when it’s a nice, bright, sunny day.”
Top Tips:
  • If grass makes you sneeze, get someone else to mow your lawn. If you react to grass and you spend time on the lawn, you'll get symptoms.
  • Create a barrier by smearing Vaseline inside your nostrils.
  • Don’t sit outside between 4pm and 7pm or in the early morning, as the pollen count is highest at these times.
  • Don’t sleep or drive with the windows open, as this will allow pollen to come in.
  • Damp dust regularly.
  • Wash your hair. Pollen is sticky and may be in your hair.
  • Vacuum. Pollen can live in carpet for up to three months.
  • Talk to your GP or pharmacist about any treatment you’re taking for hay fever as it might be worth trying a new treatment. The same antihistamine [anti-allergy treatment] doesn’t always work for someone year after year. Try something different, such as a nasal spray or a new antihistamine.

Allergy UK helpline: 01322 619898



Sun Safety
It's important to protect your and your children's skin in the sun to avoid sunburn and heat exhaustion.
Click here for NHS Choices Auestions and Answers.


Stings
Knowing how to treat an insect sting and how to recognise when it needs medical attention will help you do the right thing if you or your child are stung.
Insects such as wasps and bees sting as a defence mechanism (when they feel in danger) by injecting poisonous venom into the skin. For most people, stings are painful but harmless. But some people can have an immediate allergic reaction to being stung, which can be very dangerous.
Click here to read more.